Seven ways to increase the visibility of your research

This post is by Library Research Support Advisor, Sally Dalton

So, you’ve published your research and you’re now hoping to sit back, relax and get ready for all those citations to roll in?

Unfortunately the hard work doesn’t stop here!

Now you need to promote your research to make sure it reaches the widest possible audience, this is part of the job of being a researcher. By making your research more visible you could potentially open up future collaboration / job / publication opportunities, increase citations to your work and increase the number of people finding, reading and building on your work.

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Image source: https://pixabay.com/en/water-show-fly-airborn-raves-2092402/ (CC-0)

1. Promote your research at conferences

Conferences are a great opportunity to promote yourself and your research. Even if you aren’t presenting your work you can use the conference as an opportunity to meet other researchers and start to develop your research network. Keep an eye out for names of researchers you would like to meet and practice introducing yourself and your research. You may only have a few minutes so make sure you’re prepared!

2. Carefully consider which journals you are going to publish in

Choosing where to publish in an academic matter but there are certain questions you may want to ask yourself before choosing where to publish. Are the articles in the journal easily discoverable? Are they indexed in services such as Web of Science or Scopus? Does the journal have suitable open access options? Have you and your colleagues heard of the journal? The answers to these questions will determine how visible your article will be to other researchers. Think Check Submit provides a simple check list to make sure you choose trusted journals for your research.

3. Sign up for an ORCiD 

Having and ORCID can help to make your research more visible. ORCID is a digital identifier that helps to distinguish you from other researchers. You can link all your research outputs to your ORCID and you can keep it throughout your career. It is particularly useful for researchers with common names, who change their name throughout their career or who change institutions. No matter what changes are made you will always have the same ORCID, so other people can easily see details of your research outputs. More details on how to sign up for a free ORCID can be found here.

4. Make your research open access

Open access publishing makes scholarly works available online, free for anyone to find and read. The potential readership of open access articles is far greater than that for articles where the full-text is restricted to subscribers. Making your research open access will make it more visible. There are 2 ways to make your research outputs open access; by self-archiving in an open access repository or by publishing in an open access journal. More information on open access can be found on our open access pages.

5. Share your research data where appropriate

There is growing evidence that sharing data can increase the visibility of research. Sharing your data could allow other researchers to validate your work, build upon it and could potentially help to open up future collaboration opportunities. Learn more about managing and sharing your data on our Research Data Management pages.

6. Promote your research online

Promoting your research online will help you reach your potential audience, connect with other researchers and help you to start developing a network of online colleagues. There are a number of different social media tools such as Twitter, Instagram, Blogs and LinkedIn. Whichever tool(s) you use it is important to identify who your audience is, engage with them by asking questions, speaking up about issues that interest you and use eye catching images, videos or visualisations. You don’t need to spend a long time keeping your social media accounts up to date but you do need to be willing to write and check your account(s) regularly.

7. Track when your research is being used

Keeping up to date with who is discussing, citing or sharing your research is important. You can use this type of information on CVs and when applying for funding/jobs etc. To check who is citing your work you can look at your articles on sites such as Web of Science, Scopus or Google Scholar. If you are an early career researcher it may be more appropriate to use Altmetrics. Altmetrics looks at who is talking and sharing your research on places such as social media, in news outlets and on course syllabi. For more information on Altmetrics have a look at our Altmetrics pages.


The Research Support team run regular workshops on increasing the visibility of your research focused on different faculties, book online here (N.B. currently for postgraduate research students only, let us know if you would be interested in similar sessions for research staff).


Further reading

 

Research Data Network – University of York – June 2017

If Jisc’s 4th Research Data Network earlier this week felt a bit rushed at times, it only reflects the sheer number of exciting projects happening across the sector.

There’s still a long way to go but it felt like the dots are really starting to join up and there was lots of energy in both real and virtual space – see Storify of tweets on the #JiscRDM tag during the event.

Delegates busy networking on Tuesday evening at RDN York (thanks to Paul Stokes for the photo, used with permission)
Delegates busy networking on Tuesday evening at RDN York (thanks to Paul Stokes for the photo, used with permission)

Two packed days in York were bookended by an inspiring opening keynote from Mark Humphries asking “Who will use the Open Data?” and by a panel session the following afternoon on the principles and practice of open research, informed by the open research pilot project at the University of Cambridge.

Mark emphasised that there is a clearer rationale in some academic contexts than others. Clinical trials, for example, are time consuming and expensive and need to be safe and effective which provides a clear motivation to share data and check conclusions.

Mark singled out his own discipline of neuroscience however as lagging behind, with no discipline specific open data repositories, and inclined to “data worship”. New data is hard to get and requires considerable skill (to implant electrodes in a rat’s cortex for instance) and will underpin high-impact papers, that universal currency of academia. It’s not for sharing!

Mark reassured us, nevertheless, that open data is the future. Inevitably. If only due to the sheer scale of data being generated which simply has to be shared if it is to be analysed effectively, citing an instance whereby a single dataset generated 9 high quality papers from several labs. RDM isn’t trivial though, one of the main reasons that funding bodies are mandating data sharing.

Some 28 hours later, we were back in the same lecture theatre for the final session chaired by Marta Teperek. Our four panelists fielding questions from the floor were David Carr (Wellcome Trust), Tim Fulton, Lauren Cadwallader (both University of Cambridge) and Jennifer Harris (Birkbeck University).

There was a great deal of emphasis on the cost of open research and sustainability – by way of answer to the question above, Lauren Cadwallader referred to her recent blog post Open Resources: Who Should Pay? and shared her reservations about the ‘gold’ model of open access that is sustained by expensive Article Processing Charges to commercial publishers.

There are similarities and synergies between OA and open data initiatives, including increasing interest from publishers. There are also significant differences and it was pointed out from the floor that long term preservation is a cost that needs to be borne by someone.

Betwixt these bookends were far too many sessions to discuss in detail, covering everything from the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) to an update on the work HESA is doing in relation to research data in the context of REF2021, Archivematica for preservation and some fantastic resources for business case development and costing for RDM (including a number of useful case studies). Then there’s the Research Data Alliance which *anyone* is able to join and which offers a window onto many different communities.

It was particularly interesting to learn about ongoing developments with Jisc’s shared service which is working with 13 pilot institutions on repository and preservation solutions and comprises a range of tools to capture, preserve, disseminate and allow reporting. The pilot offer also includes training, support and gathering of best practice. Pilot users will be testing these systems throughout the summer and providing feedback with a view to rolling out production between April and July 2018.

The UK research data discovery service (beta), part of the Jisc Research at Risk challenge to develop RDM infrastructure, enables the discovery of data from UK HEI’s and national data centres.

Leeds contributed to the event by sharing lessons learned when setting up our RDM service and with a lightning talk.

All in all a valuable couple of days with lots of information still to synthesise and file away. Indeed to preserve in one’s cortex…now where’s that neuroscientist?

Slides from all sessions and extensive notes are available from https://research-data-network.readme.io/v2.01/docs/4th-research-data-network-york-university